#248 Appreciation + Gratitude

Practicing appreciation isn’t necessarily about looking for and finding things to appreciate. Rather, it’s being aware, in the moment, of the things that please you. Practicing appreciation is noticing those things, and noticing the pleasure they bring you. You don’t have to search out something to appreciate — simply appreciate what is already there.

The breeze on your skin; a purring cat; birdsong; chopping an onion; listening to Bonnie Rait (or Nat King Cole, or…)  making sauerkraut; getting into bed at night; waking in the morning; stars; sun; people; a particular person; smells; tastes; breathing; seeing a tree, a leaf, a flower; taking a nap; reading a good book; petting a dog; completing a task. Notice that thing, and notice the pleasure it brings you.

Then you can notice that one of the things that gives you pleasure is noticing the things that give you pleasure! Take just a second to feel all the pleasure. Receive it!

That’s one way to practice appreciation.

Then, once you’re appreciating all the things in your day-to-day life that bring you pleasure (so many!) you can experience the ecstasy of gratitude. These daily gifts of pleasure! Oh joy!

By the way, how’s it going with generosity?

#247 Bubble of Love

I’ve talked about your aura of love. About my aura of love. But what does “aura” mean?

I find that it’s easier to understand my so-called energy field as a “bubble.” And it’s easy to imagine that my bubble is composed of love.

My lexicon recognizes “bubble,” but it’s not so sure about “aura.”

And one fun thing — when I’m in a car, or in an airplane, or on a bus, or even walking, my bubble just rolls along with me. I can expand my bubble to encompass any vehicle I’m in, indeed any space I’m in. And it just keeps rolling along, with me in it’s center.

And since it’s round, my bubble reaches below my feet. My bubble grounds me.

I’m loving my bubble of love!

#246 Practice Happiness

Happiness isn’t something that just happens to you if you’re lucky. Happiness can be practiced.

It’s like a muscle. In many, it’s like a muscle that is too seldom used and has become puny. Build your happiness muscle! Practice happiness; practice appreciation.

When you walk through any door, pause and find something to appreciate. When you get in or out of your car; when you turn a corner; when you answer the phone; when you’re shopping for groceries; when you’re waiting in line — all day long, in every situation, find something to appreciate.

Practice appreciation assiduously. You’ll be happy you did!

#244 Cultivate Generosity

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASpring is such a generous time of year.

Although spring is arriving at Blanco State Park, where I live in the winter, I do realize it’s not quite spring where many of you are. But maybe a great outpouring of generosity will attract spring to you.

Now is an excellent time to cultivate generosity.

First, notice how are you not generous in your life. Are you stingy with money, do you hold it close, do you spend it mainly on your own behalf? Then use money as a way to practice generosity. Give! And love the giving.

Are you stingy with your acceptance of others? Are you stingy with your curiosity about others? Are you stingy with your time?

Ponder this — the ways you are stingy are road signs directing you to the Way of Generosity.

Try it — between now and the fullness of summer, make generosity your spiritual practice.

Stay open, stay vulnerable, stay free. Cultivate generosity. And let me know how it goes.

#243 A Valentine Exercise

A valentine exercise.

Pay attention to the expectations you have of the valentine/s in your life, especially any expectations you have of how your valentines should express their love for you. Rather than expecting them to show their love for you in the way that you would, be open to their way of showing their love.

Let me know.

Stay open, stay vulnerable, stay free. Eschew expectations. Cultivate acceptance.

#242 Eschew Expectations!

Here’s one thing about having expectations — when you have expectations of another, you’re likely to end up relating to your expectations and not to the person.

When my friend says she’ll be here at 6:00, I expect her to be on time. When she doesn’t arrive until 6:20, my anger and other emotions are all swirling around my expectations. I may think my feelings are caused by my friend, but in truth they are a reaction to my expectations. Without my expectations, there’d be nothing to swirl around.

When I expect that someone will be happy to see me and they’re not, all of my resulting emotions — confusion, anxiety, irritation, shame, blame, fear, etc — have only to do with my expectations. I may feel like I’m relating to the other person, but in reality I’m relating to my expectations.

I place my expectations between me and the other. You place your expectations between you and the other. You’ve seen it — in some relationships the expectations eventually pile up into a wall that cannot be breached by either party.

My expectations prevent me from focusing on the person or on the situation at hand. My expectations keep me focused only on my expectations.

Stay open, stay vulnerable, stay free. Eschew expectations!