#106

Last summer, on June 30, in issue #48, I wrote:

“I know I’ve talked about this before, but lately the topic has been nudging me something fierce. It wants attention: Expectations. They can get you into such trouble.”

Well, the subject of expectations has once again been around a lot. It is a perennial problem. So I want to remind you of what one reader wrote about expectations last year:

“When I discover that I have expectations, I try to remember this quote from some Al-Anon sisters; ‘Expectations are planned resentments.’ ”

Think of times you experienced disappointment, blame, anger, frustration, shame, even grief — then search around those experiences. I’m willing to bet that you’ll find expectations.

This week, eschew expectations.

#104

A reader had this to say about Tenacity Notes #102 (the one with the José Martí poem):

“Your radical idea of leaving a conflict better than you found it is having a profound impact on my family. My daughter has been embroiled in conflict with her teenage son for a few years. Although I am not a part of the conflict, I have watched it and have been disturbed by it. After I received your newsletter, I wondered if there was a way that I could leave that conflict better than I find it. What I did was I showed your newsletter to my daughter.

She resisted your idea at first; she has been so committed to being right. But she was eventually able to see the wisdom in your idea. She continues to work out just what it means for her to leave this conflict better than she found it. But I believe that she has taken it to heart.

I had been afraid that my daughter and her son would become permanently estranged, they were so at odds. But now there is hope. You have given me hope, and you have given my daughter hope. And I believe you have also given it to my grandson, even if he doesn’t know it yet. Thank you for the wisdom you continue to dispense in your newsletters.”

#103

I’ve made 3 new Intention Cards, and  if I may say so myself, they are very nice.

You can buy them from me for cost plus mailing — $3 per set of 3. You can go to my Web site, to the Intention Cards page, and purchase them there via PayPal. Click this link to buy New Intention Cards.

Or you can reply to this email and arrange to send me a check. If so, be sure to let me know how many sets of 3 you want, and give me your mailing address.

These 3 new cards bring the deck to 20 cards. I expect I’ll be drawing more, I have a few images roaming around in my head. I’ll let you know.

If you don’t yet have a set of Intention Cards, you can purchase them via my Web site also. Click this link to buy your Intention Cards. Or you can reply to this email. A set of 20 cards is $16, which includes shipping.

Enjoy using your cards. Enjoy the fulfillment they usher in. And remember that I’m always interested to hear about your experiences with the cards.

#106

Last summer, on June 30, in issue #48, I wrote:

“I know I’ve talked about this before, but lately the topic has been nudging me something fierce. It wants attention: Expectations. They can get you into such trouble.”

Well, the subject of expectations has once again been around a lot. It is a perennial problem. So I want to remind you of what one reader wrote about expectations last year:

“When I discover that I have expectations, I try to remember this quote from some Al-Anon sisters; ‘Expectations are planned resentments.’ ”

Think of times you experienced disappointment, blame, anger, frustration, shame, even grief — then search around those experiences. I’m willing to bet that you’ll find expectations.

This week, eschew expectations.

#102

Along the lines of leaving a place better than you found it, I give you a poem by José Martí.

The place in this poem could be named conflict. Always leave a conflict better than you found it. Which is quite different from the way we’re used to thinking about conflict; always leave a conflict as the victor.

Think about your conflicts now — with your spouse, your kids, another driver, a co-worker, a neighbor — and bring in the concept of leaving the conflict better than you found it. It changes things, doesn’t it?

Think about conflicts in the past and imagine how different they would have turned out if you’d had the mindset to always leave a conflict better than you found it.

I Cultivate a White Rose
By José Martí

I cultivate a white rose
In July as in January
For the sincere friend
Who gives me his hand honestly.

And for the cruel person who tears out
the heart with which I live,
I cultivate neither nettles nor thorns:
I cultivate a white rose.

Since I’m studying Spanish, you also get the poem in it’s original language. I didn’t, nor could I, do the translation.

Cultivo Una Rosa Blanca
Por José Martí

Cultivo una rosa blanca
En julio como en enero,
Para el amigo sincero
Que me da su mano franca.

Y para el cruel que me arranca
El coraózn con que vivo,
Cardo ni ortiga cultivo,
Cultivo una rosa blanca.

Go to my Savvy Psychic Web site.